That Chicken and Noodle Stuff With Breadcrumbs on top.

I don’t make it like this.  I may use grilled chicken breasts cut up & canned broth, but it’s all about the same.  Right?

chickenandnoodlestuff

This one is good for potlucks, covered dish dinners, or picnics.  Works well with egg noodles, or any of those Amish looking packaged noodles.  Don’t be stingy on the butter.  This isn’t health food.  Carrots or celery added in may make it a bit more like chicken noodle soup without the broth.  The broth is only to keep the noodles barely wet and the chicken from drying out.  I may mix some spices in with the breadcrumbs too.  Maybe poultry seasoning?

 

 

 

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Beer Barbecue Sauce / Master the beer barbecue sauce

From:  http://draftmag.com/recipes/detail/234

Beer Barbecue Sauce

Recipe by Caitlin King

Sweet, savory, tangy and ever-so-easy, our beer barbecue sauce goes with everything grillable and is open to experimentation: Pour in a porter when you’re cooking beef, an amber ale for chicken, and something fruity when you’re working with pork.

Serves:

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/3 cup chopped onion
  • 2 tablespoons garlic
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 cups ketchup
  • 2 tablespoons honey Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon molasses
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/3 teaspoon hot sauce, or to taste
  • 1 cup beer

Instructions:

In a saucepot over medium-high heat, add the oil, onion and garlic; cook until the onions begin to soften, about 4 minutes. Add the Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, honey Dijon, molasses, brown sugar, salt, pepper and hot sauce; bring to a boil, then simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the sauce from heat and add the beer, . For a smoother sauce, strain out the onions or pulse in a blender.

 

From:  http://draftmag.com/new/feature/master-the-beer-barbecue-sauce/

Master the beer barbecue sauce

Slather a seriously savory (and seriously easy) brew-based barbecue sauce on beef, chicken or pork. Use our basic recipe below, and change the beer according to what you grill.

You’re grilling: beef  Pour in: a porter

A malty beer with a dose of roast makes a thick, rich sauce that stands up to burly beef flavor; a smooth porter laden with chocolate or smoke can muscle its way through all that meat. Heat lovers: Add a teaspoon of chopped chilies or a few dashes of extra hot sauce; a porter base will be thick and sweet enough to handle it.

You’re grilling: chicken  Pour in: an amber ale

Chicken’s moist white meat opens up nicely to the gentle malt flavors of a well-balanced amber; the beer’s caramel notes and pop of citrusy hops are strong enough to counter the smoke and spice that develop on the grill—think sweet meets savory.

You’re grilling: pork  Pour in: a fruit ale

No matter the cut, pork’s a juicy, tender blank canvas. A sweet apricot ale or berry lambic pumps up barbecue sauce’s sweetness; the pork’s earthiness keeps the sugar in check. Fruit acids make them natural meat tenderizers; consider adding chopped fresh or glazed apricots or raspberries into the mix for extra fruit flavor.

Published July/August 2012

Sweet, savory, tangy and ever-so-easy, our beer barbecue sauce goes with everything grillable and is open to experimentation.

asparagus in phyllo dough

From Lynn on Google+:

Lynn Warren – I wrap asparagus in phyllo dough that’s been brushed with melted butter and parmasean cheese, you wrap the asparagus with it and bake. very easy, and can be eaten at room temp, etc.

Sounds ridiculously excellent & easy.  If you’re a fan of asparagus, you may enjoy it steamed, grilled, roasted, or even nuked.  I love the stuff if it’s prepared well.  This sounds like it would go over quite well.  Parmesan cheese is always a win.  Maybe some Romano… and I may add garlic.  If we wanted to get really nuts, we could wrap ’em in bacon & and the dough.

Found a recipe from Paula Deen that says to bake at 375° for 15-18 minutesGoogle for ideas!