That Chicken and Noodle Stuff With Breadcrumbs on top.

I don’t make it like this.  I may use grilled chicken breasts cut up & canned broth, but it’s all about the same.  Right?

chickenandnoodlestuff

This one is good for potlucks, covered dish dinners, or picnics.  Works well with egg noodles, or any of those Amish looking packaged noodles.  Don’t be stingy on the butter.  This isn’t health food.  Carrots or celery added in may make it a bit more like chicken noodle soup without the broth.  The broth is only to keep the noodles barely wet and the chicken from drying out.  I may mix some spices in with the breadcrumbs too.  Maybe poultry seasoning?

 

 

 

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Bootlegger’s Beef

From:  http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Bootleggers-Beef-1254

Bootlegger’s Beef

Bon Appétit  | February 1996

user rating

89% would make it again

user rating

user rating:
Bootlegger’s Beef 4 forks

at a glance

main ingredients VegetableWhiskeyBeef

yield: Serves 4

Use a blended Canadian whisky (purchased legally, of course). It is slightly sweet and will help balance the peppery sauce that naps the roasted beef… more
  • 1 2-pound butt-end beef tenderloin roast, well trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 cup canned beef broth
  • 1/3 cup Canadian whisky
  • 1 tablespoon all purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon butter, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup whipping cream
  • 2 teaspoons coarsely crushed black peppercorns

print a shopping list for this recipe view wine pairings

Preparation

Preheat oven to 400°F. Pat beef tenderloin dry with paper towels. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Heat vegetable oil in heavy large ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add beef to skillet and cook until brown on all sides, about 8 minutes. Add chopped onions, carrots and thyme to skillet.

Transfer skillet to oven and roast beef until meat thermometer inserted into thickest part registers 120°F for rare, stirring vegetables occasionally, about 30 minutes. Transfer beef to platter. Tent with foil to keep warm.

Place skillet with vegetables over medium-high heat. Add canned beef broth and whisky and bring to boil, scraping up any browned bits. Boil until liquid is reduced to 2/3 cup, stirring occasionally, about 7 minutes. Strain sauce and return to skillet.

Mix flour and butter in small bowl until smooth paste forms. Add to sauce in skillet and whisk until well blended. Add whipping cream, crushed black peppercorns and any accumulated juices from beef. Simmer over medium heat until sauce thickens, whisking constantly, about 3 minutes. Season sauce to taste with salt.

Cut beef into thick slices and arrange on platter. Spoon sauce over.

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☘ Market District® | Beef & Guinness® Stew ☘

This is from:  http://www.marketdistrict.com/Create/Recipes/Detail.aspx?RecipeID=136&RecipeCategoryID=8&Page=1&om_cid=s-tw-122011

It looks/sounds tasty.

Beef & Guinnes® Stew

Compliments of your Market District® Recipe Development Team
Serves: 6
Prep Time: 25 min.
Cooking Time: 2 hrs.

Ingredients

1/4 cup canola or vegetable oil
2 lbs. stewing beef
1 large onion — diced
1lb. bag carrots — peeled, sliced and quartered
5 stalks celery — cut into 1/2-inch slices
8 oz. package mushrooms — sliced
4 14.5 oz. cans beef broth — divided
14.9 oz. can Guinness® (or 15 oz. beef broth)
6 oz. can tomato paste plus 1 can water
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
salt and pepper to taste
1/4 cup fresh parsley — minced

Directions

In a large saucepan, heat oil. Add beef and all its juices, and brown on all sides, about 20 minutes or until liquid cooks off. Add vegetables, 3 cans of beef broth, and beer. Empty can of tomato paste into a small bowl. Fill empty tomato paste can with water and combine with tomato paste, then add to saucepan. Cook stew uncovered for 1 hour, 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. In a small bowl, combine remaining can of beef broth with flour to make a paste. Add flour paste to saucepan and stir to incorporate and thicken. Cook an additional 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Season with salt and pepper to taste and garnish with parsley. Serve with crusty bread.

Chili with SQUASH?

I love squash with a little heat from Paprika or Cayenne… why not chili with squash in it?  I’ll refer to these for inspiration:

☆★☆

☕ From: http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/beef-and-butternut-squash-chili-10000001144129/

Recipes > Beef-and-Butternut Squash Chili

Beef-and-Butternut Squash Chili

We’ve loaded this chili with beef and beans for zinc and B vitamins, tomatoes and green peppers for vitamin C, and butternut squash for beta-carotene.

Worthy of a special occasion

Yield: Makes 8 servings (serving size: 1 cup)

from Southern Living

Recipe Time

Cook Time: 50 Minutes
Prep Time: 20 Minutes

Nutritional Information

Amount per serving

  • Calories: 234
  • Calories from fat: 22%
  • Fat: 6g
  • Saturated fat: 2.3g
  • Monounsaturated fat: 2.3g
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 0.4g
  • Protein: 17g
  • Carbohydrate: 30g
  • Fiber: 6.8g
  • Cholesterol: 21mg
  • Iron: 2.9mg
  • Sodium: 642mg
  • Calcium: 65mg

Ingredients

  • 1 pound extra-lean ground beef
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 (14.5-ounce) cans Mexican-style stewed tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 (16-ounce) can chili beans
  • 1/2 small butternut squash, peeled and cubed (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 cup low-sodium beef broth
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 cup frozen corn kernels

Preparation

  • Cook beef, bell pepper, and next 2 ingredients in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat until meat crumbles and is no longer pink. Drain well, and return to Dutch oven.
  • Stir in tomatoes and next 5 ingredients; bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer, stirring occasionally, 15 minutes. Stir in corn, and cook, uncovered, 15 minutes or until squash is tender and chili is thickened.

Southern Living
JANUARY 2006

☆★☆

☕ From:  http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/sunny-anderson/beefy-butternut-squash-chili-recipe/index.html

Beefy Butternut Squash Chili Recipe

Beefy Butternut Squash Chili

Sunny AndersonRecipe courtesy Sunny Anderson

Show: Cooking for RealEpisode: Carving Out Some Fun

Rated 4 stars out of 5
Total Time:
1 hr 35 min
Prep
20 min
Cook
1 hr 15 min
Yield:
6 to 8 servings
Level:
Easy

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 teaspoons dry oregano
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound beef chuck or stewing meat, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 cup finely chopped white onion
  • 1 cup seeded and chopped red bell pepper
  • 3 cloves garlic, grated on rasp or finely minced
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons hot sauce (recommended: Frank’s Red Hot Sauce)
  • 1 pound ground chuck (80-percent lean)
  • 2 tablespoons fine cornmeal
  • 1 1/2 cups red wine (recommended: any inexpensive Chianti)
  • 1 1/2 cups beef stock
  • 1 (1 1/2 pound) butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch cubes

Directions

In a small bowl combine the cumin, chili powder, pumpkin pie spice, oregano, 2 teaspoons salt and a few grinds of black pepper.

In a large pot over medium heat add the olive oil, beef cubes and half of the seasoning. Cook until the beef is browned on all sides, but not cooked through; remove with a slotted spoon to a plate. Add the onions, bell pepper, garlic, tomato paste and hot sauce. Stir and cook until everything turns a dark reddish brown, about 10 minutes. Add the ground beef and sprinkle over the remaining seasoning. Stir and cook until beef is browned then add the reserved beef chunks back to the pot along with the cornmeal, wine, stock, and the squash. Raise the heat until it comes to a boil, then lower to a simmer, cover and cook until the beef is tender, about 40 to 45 minutes. Uncover and let the chili cook another 15 minutes, until it is thick and the liquid is reduced.

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☆★☆

☕ From:  http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Black-Bean-Chili-with-Butternut-Squash-and-Swiss-Chard-234146

Black Bean Chili with Butternut Squash and Swiss Chard

Bon Appétit  | March 2006

Bon Appétit Test Kitchen

user rating

94% would make it again

user rating

user rating:
Black Bean Chili with Butternut Squash and Swiss Chard 3½ forks

at a glance

main ingredients VegetableLeafy GreenButternut SquashBean

cuisine American

type Quick & EasySoup/Stew

dietary considerations VegetarianLow FatLow CalHigh FiberHealthyVegan

yield: Makes 4 main-course servings

active time: 45 minutes

total time: 45 minutes

Top with chopped fresh cilantro, red onions, and grated cheddar cheese, if you like.
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 1/2 cups chopped onions
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 2 1/2 cups 1/2-inch pieces peeled butternut squash
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 3 15-ounce cans black beans, rinsed, drained
  • 2 1/2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 14 1/2-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice
  • 3 cups (packed) coarsely chopped Swiss chard leaves (from 1 small bunch)

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Preparation

Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add onions and garlic; sauté until tender and golden, about 9 minutes. Add squash; stir 2 minutes. Stir in chili powder and cumin. Stir in beans, broth, and tomatoes with juices; bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until squash is tender, about 15 minutes. Stir in chard; simmer until chard is tender but still bright green, about 4 minutes longer. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle chili into bowls and serve.

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☆★☆

☕ From:  http://www.meatlessmonday.com/yellow-squash-chili/

Yellow Squash Chili

The addition of sunny yellow squash gives this hearty chili a bright summer flavor. Don’t be afraid to dip your bread straight in the bowl. This recipe comes to us from Grace of Going to Graceland.

  • 1 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, diced
  • 1 large carrot, chopped
  • 1 medium bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, diced
  • 1 zucchini, chopped
  • 1 yellow squash, chopped
  • 1 can black beans
  • 1 can refried beans
  • 1 can kidney beans
  • 2 large cans crushed tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoons oregano

Serves 6

Heat the olive oil in a large stew pot over medium heat.

Sauté the onion, carrot, bell pepper, celery, zucchini, yellow squash in the olive oil for 8-10 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

Add the canned beans, tomatoes, chili powder, and oregano.

Mix and simmer for 20 minutes.

Just before serving, season with salt and pepper to taste.

Serve with bread or crackers.

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Nutrition Information

Yellow Squash Chili
  • Servings per Recipe: 6
  • Amount per Serving
  • Calories: 330
  • Calories from Fat: 45
  • Total Fat: 5.0g
  • Saturated Fat: 1.0g
  • Cholesterol: 6mg
  • Sodium: 1064mg
  • Potassium: 1571mg
  • Total Carbohydrates: 60.2g
  • Dietary Fiber: 18.3g
  • Protein: 16.7g
  • Sugars: 14.5g
  •  
  • View our Nutritional Guidelines
  • The FDA recommends 2000 calories a day as a reasonable average guideline for most adults. Click here to learn how you can use the Monday 2000 to reset the calorie budget you have to spend each day. For specific calorie recommendations based on your age, metabolism and medical history, consult your doctor or nutritionist.

Send us your Meatless Monday Recipes!

Goofy noodles, fancy bacon, & squash? I’m in.

Bought some Campanelle because boxes of pasta were cheap, and it looked neat.

I looked for a campanelle recipe online, & this popped up:

http://www.barillaus.com/Recipes/Campanelle-with-Butternut-Squash-Crispy-Italian-Pancetta-and-Balsamic-Vinegar.aspx

I love all of these ingredients, but I may lose the onion or substitute garlic…
Campanelle with Butternut Squash, Crispy Italian Pancetta and Balsamic Vinegar
INGREDIENTS

  • 1 BOX Barilla Campanelle
  • 1/3 CUP Italian Pancetta, Julienne
  • 1/4 CUP Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1/2 CUP White Onion, Chopped
  • 1 POUND Butternut Squash, Peeled, Cubed
  • TO TASTE Salt
  • TO TASTE Black Pepper, Freshly Ground
  • 1 SPRIG Fresh Rosemary
  • 1 1/2 CUP Chicken Broth
  • TO TASTE Balsamic Vinegar

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

  1. SAUTÉ pancetta in a large skillet over medium- high heat until crispy. Drain excess fat.Set aside.
  2. HEAT olive oil in the same skillet over medium heat. Add onions and rosemary, sauté until golden.
  3. ADD the butternut squash and the chicken broth. Simmer for 10-15 minutes or until the squash gets soft.
  4. DISCARD the rosemary. Season with salt and pepper. Process half of the sauce in the blender until smooth. Thin sauce with more chicken broth if desired. Return sauce to pan.
  5. COOK pasta according to directions and toss with the sauce.
  6. TOP the pasta with pancetta , drizzle with Balsamic vinegar.

Visit BarillaUS.com for more delicious Italian recipe ideas.
©2010 Barilla. All Rights reserved.

Campanelle with Butternut Squash, Crispy Italian Pancetta and Balsamic Vinegar
Campanelle with Butternut Squash, Crispy Italian Pancetta and Balsamic Vinegar

Baked Potato Soup Recipe..

I need to try this:

From:  http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Baked-Potato-Soup/Detail.aspx

Looks tasty…

Baked Potato Soup

By: Kristi Teague
“‘A good friend who runs a bed-and-breakfast game me this creamy potato soup recipe that’s become a winter favorite,’ recalls Kristi Teague of Southside, Tennessee. ‘A dash of hot sauce a little basil give it special flavor.'”

This Kitchen Approved Recipe has an average star rating of 4.7 Rate/Review | Read Reviews (1,543)

73,693 people have saved this | 39 custom versions

Prep Time:
10 Min
Cook Time:
20 Min
Ready In:
30 Min

Servings  (Help)

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Original Recipe Yield 4 servings

Ingredients

Directions

  1. In a large saucepan, cook bacon until crisp. Drain, reserving 1 tablespoon drippings. Set bacon aside. Saute onion and garlic in the drippings until tender. Stir in flour, salt, basil and pepper; mix well. Gradually add broth. Bring to boil; boil and stir for 2 minutes. Add the potatoes, cream and hot pepper sauce; heat through but do not boil. Garnish with bacon, cheese and parsley.
Maybe I’ll add some beer..

Hot Dog How To

I did an article a while ago on my other blog called More than 6 ways to cook a hot dog.  It’s a nice general guide to several ways of cooking an old standard.

Here’s a reprint…

A while ago, I blogged about stumbling on to an article listing 6 ways too cook a hot dog.  We all know there’s more.  Here’s a much better list.  OK, maybe not better… but bigger. Thanks to everyone for their suggestions submissions here and on Facebook, I hope to include them all here.

Oh well, on to the list…

  1. Grill ‘em. The general consensus seems to be that if you’re going to cook a hot dog, it needs to be grilled.  I would agree with this.  I usually don’t break out hot dogs unless I’m already grilling burgers.  They’re there for those weird non-burger people, or a topping for your burger.
    • Charcoal Grill – This is old school grilling, get it hot let the flames & coals cook the dog with some nice grill lines or looking like the victim of a flame-thrower accident.  There are good instructions on grilling w/ gas & charcoal here (as if you need them).
    • Propane Grill – It’s a little easier to control the heat, & you’re less likely to produce the same flame-thrower victim effect if you keep an eye on ‘em. There are also good instructions on grilling w/ gas & charcoal here (again, as if you need them).
    • Foreman Grill – Or any of the imitators & whatever they’re called.  I’ve seen a Hamilton Beach one, I’ve seen them called electric grills, counter-top grills, whatever… you know what I’m talking about.  I’ve had little success with the Foreman Grill & hot dogs… which is odd, because it cooks other stuff quite easily.  Here’s a video on how to cook ‘em on the Foreman Grill, …because I can’t find good text for it anywhere.  They don’t list a time for hot dogs in the book that comes with it.  Maybe they assume their grill is for convenience, and it’s more convenient to nuke or boil your dogs.  If anyone has $99 to spare, I’ll take the USB iGrill from Think Geek.
    • Infrared Grill – I know nothing about this newfangled contraption.  It looks like you can burn a hot dog in 0.5 seconds on one.  Learn about infrared grills at Wikipedia.
    • Griddle/Flattop Grill – If you have one in your house, you are awesome.  You can certainly cook a hot dog on one, and don’t need me to tell you how.
  2. Open Flame. Who doesn’t love hot dogs (or anything really) cooked over a campfire? …Or a bonfire, trash barrel fire, or while the neighbor’s house is burning down? With these methods, You can also wrap the dog with biscuit or croissant dough from those creepy popping tubes, and it will cook nicely over an open flame.  If you want to get really crazy, slice it down the middle & stuff cheese in it, or wrap some cheese around it before the dough.
    • Skewer – We use roasting forks or or just sticks.  You can get the forks at any sporting goods or camping store, in a store that has a camping section, or in a store near your camping site.  You can get sticks in the woods, or from a lone, sad tree.  You can also get inventive, like this guy.  Be careful choosing sticks and being inventive… you don’t want anything that will poison your hot dog… like toxic wood, metal treated or painted with anything, and of course plastic.  I can’t seem to find a guide online of safe & unsafe tree branches to use when cooking over a fire.  Anyone have a boy scout handbook?  (I asked Yahoo!, apparently nothing out there will kill you, but stick with a non-sappy wood.) With this method, get your fire going, and hold the hot dog over it… but not in the flame unless you like black crispy possibly carcinogen-laced hot dogs.  If using a store-bought fork, it’s up to you if you want to put the dog on long-ways, or double/triple ‘em up the forks.
    • Pie Iron – If you’ve camped with me, you’ve cooked with a pie iron… or you’ve watched me cook with one.  My favorites include pizza ones, and Reubens… but I’m sure you could stuff a hot dog into one.  They also have ones that are shaped to cook hot dogs.  This would most likely result in a nicely cooked dog without the singe marks, maybe flavored with some onions (gross!) or sauerkraut.  If you’re buying  a pie iron, buy one made of… iron.  This sounds dumb, but they make aluminum ones, and I have melted them with no problem.  I don’t think you want aluminum flavored hot dogs.
    • The Cage – Burger basket, grill basket, vegetable basket – all different names for a similar utensil.  I’d use it like I would a fork for hot-dog cooking… may be sort of useless unless you have a burger in it too.
    • The Rack – If you can find some sort of rack or grate that you can secure safely over the fire that’s also safe to cook on, you can cook like it’s a charcoal grill if you’re more comfortable with that.  Just make sure the flame isn’t eating your hot dog before you do.
    • Foil Pack – You could use the bread dough & any toppings/sides here as well.  Wrap the dog & even the bun in foil, and place it on a grate over the flames, or in the coals around the bottom of the fire like you would with a baked potato.
    • Oven Burner – That’s right.  Pit it on a fork or roasting fork, and hold it over the flame on your stove top.  This might not be safe, but I bet it would be fun.
  3. Boiled – I’m sure you’ve all had ‘em like this.  I think it even suggests to heat ‘em this way on the pack.  I’m not a fan of boiling anything any more, unless it’s soup or pasta.  It just seems like a lot of flavor goes into the water… and where hot dogs are concerned, it’s not like you have a lot to work with to begin with.  I’d suggest boiling hot dogs in beer, even though I’ve never tried it… it sounds pretty awesome.  You can even get crazy with beer, ketchup, and brown sugar.  Maybe some beef broth or bullion would be cool here too… but that may make ‘em to salty?  I dunno.  Boil at your own risk.
  4. Nuke ‘em – I guess that besides grilling, this would seem to be the most obvious method of cooking hot dogs.  On the last pack we bought, this method was featured larger than the other methods.  Just 30 – 40 seconds in the microwave … wrapped in a paper towel?  I never use the paper towel.  Is that to hold in moisture, prevent explosions, or what?  Apparetly there’s an art to this, because I have found the articles How to Cook a Hot Dog in a Microwave and the possible passive-aggressive How to Cook a Hot Dog in the Microwave Without Exploding the Ends.  As I write this, I have an urge to make some hot dogs explode in the microwave.  I may be developing a disorder.
  5. Lovin’ from the Oven – You can certainly cook hot dogs in the oven, you may split ‘em open or poke them with a fork first.  This method would be ideal for the croissant-wrapped hot dogs, smothered in some awesome cheese.  Just make sure if you use the 1st linked method, that you put the foil in the oven before you heat it up (like they so diligently mentioned)… or don’t do that, burn yourself, and stay off of the internet.
  6. Deep Fried – They call these Rippers in New Jersey, no?  I don’t have a fryer… but I suppose I could do this in a pot on the stove, or in my turkey fryer.  I’ve never had one, but I’d imagine it’s a pretty good thing.  Corn dogs could be lumped in here too, I guess.
  7. Steamed – This seems to be a popular method, but I know I’ve never done it, or really seen it done.  I guess there are commercial steam cabinets for hot dogs… but I bet you could steam it like you do with vegetables if you have a steamer.  Perhaps, like boiling… you could steam it with beer…?
  8. In the Skillet. – Or frying pan.  Just fry it on the stove top with a little bit of oil.  I guess you could slice it open first if you wanted to, so it doesn’t pop on you.  Or, you can elevate it to an art form.
  9. Crock PotPop ‘em in the crock pot with some sauerkraut (maybe along with some beer), and you’re good to go.
  10. Car EngineWhy not?
  11. In Stuff – Okay this isn’t one specific method, but I didn’t feel like all of these should have their own #’s on the list.  You know you’ve chopped ‘em up and added them to baked beans, mac n’ cheese, or even done a hot dog & potato bake.  Here I’ll also inject that I once got the SpaghettiOs with hot dogs.  They were inexplicably gross.  This is your final warning.
  12. Goofy Single-Purpose Appliances – I have hot dogs only occasionally.  I can’t imagine getting one of these hot dog cookers that serves only one purpose.  Our counter-space is quite limited.. and I can’t see that breaking one of these things out would be worth the novelty after more than a few uses…
    • The Hot Dog Toaster – Besides looking creepy, these also apparently cook hot dogs.  It looks to be just a toaster with hot dog-shaped holes and bun-shaped holes.  I wonder if it really cooks the thing through very well?  May be quite convenient.
    • Solar Hot Dog Cooker – This might be fun for campers or science geeks.  Solar ovens are pretty awesome, this one and this one are especially geared for hot dogs… this one might work.
    • The Roller – These apparently come in several varieties, but all look to be the same concept… Cooked on rollers like the ones you see at the convenience stores.  Brookstone makes one, there are a bunch of professional ones, and Nostalgia Electrics offers the Roller & “Ferris Wheel” varieties.
    • The “Roast My Weenie” guy – More of an accessory, this really just needs to be seen.
    • Electrocute it – My cousin told me a tale via Facebook of a hot dog cooker for electric chair, taser, and Tesla enthusiasts… called the Presto Hot Dogger.  Mad scientists can try it at home with a few things from around the house.  This actually looks pretty awesome.  This vintage one looks like a torture device.

Well, those are all the methods I can think of right now.  Well, other than going to Sheetz or Dormont Dogs… you should be able to get your hot dog fix by one of the methods described here.  If you have another technique, please list it in the comments below!

If you need more info… check out the list of hot dog variations.

Also up for discussion… now that you know how to cook one, what do you want on your hot dog?