The Easiest (And Most Delicious) Way to Make French Fries

 

French Fries
French Fries (Photo credit: fritish)

 

From: http://shine.yahoo.com/shine-food/easiest-most-delicious-way-french-fries-201100720.html

 

The Easiest (And Most Delicious) Way to Make French Fries

By bon appétit magazine | Shine Food – 3 hours ago

 

Photo by Marcus Nilsson

Photo by Marcus NilssonBy Adam Rapoport, Bon Appétit

Slow-Fried French Fries
There are certain foods that are better when not made at home, like french fries. To achieve golden-brown perfection, you have to fry them twice: first at a low temperature, to poach them; then at a high heat, to crisp them up. Very tasty, very much a pain in the neck. A few years back, I read about how French chef Joel Robuchon supposedly does it at his house: He puts sliced potatoes in a pot of cold oil, turns on the heat, and lets them go. It sounds too simple to work. But as the temperature rises, the potatoes cook from the outer layer in until the fries are wonderfully crunchy outside and creamy in the center. You’ll never make fries any other way-even if you’ve never made them before.

Read More: The Best New Restaurants of 2012

Preparation
Peel 2 lb. large russet potatoes; cut into long french-fry sticks, about 3/8×3/8 inches thick. Rinse; shake off water.

Transfer potatoes to a large deep heavy pot, spreading potatoes so they’re no more than 2 layers deep. Pour in safflower or vegetable oil to cover potatoes by 1″. Place pot over medium heat. Cook for 15 minutes (oil will begin bubbling gently). Continue cooking, occasionally loosening potatoes from the bottom of the pot with a heatproof spatula, until potatoes are very tender, 25-30 minutes more. Increase heat to medium-high and cook until golden and crisp, about 15 minutes longer (oil will bubble more vigorously).

Using a slotted spoon, transfer fries to paper towels to drain. Season with coarse sea salt.

More from Bon Appétit:

How to Build a Better Burger
10 Kitchen Upgrades for Under $50
Junk Food Makeover: Tater Tots
10 Snacks You Thought Were Healthy But Really Aren’t

 

Frying french fries
Frying french fries (Photo credit: fritish)

 

 

 

Baked zucchini and mozzarella

Baked zucchini and mozzarella

Posted on December 6, 2011 by

There are few things as easy and delicious as this zucchini magic trick. Slice, sprinkle, bake et voila, deliciousness. The zucchini become soft and buttery, the garlic salt gives depth of flavor, and the cheese bubbles in to a golden brown crust.

Baked zucchini and mozzarella

2 medium sized (or about 5 small) zucchini
garlic salt
salt
olive oil
2 C shredded mozzarella cheese

Slice your zucchini up into 1/2 inch rings. Lay them out flat on a large cookie sheet. Sprinkle with garlic salt and a bit of salt. Bake in the oven at 350 for about 10-15 minutes or until crisp tender.

Take the pan out of the oven and sprinkle the zucchini with cheese. Turn the oven to broil and let the cheese get all bubbly and a bit browned. This should only take about 3-5 minutes.

Enjoy right out of the oven.

You and 51 other bloggers like this post.
  • My Grav
  • lovemvliving
  • woolendreams
  • madisoncary
  • A Bahamian In Austria
  • Boodoomoo
  • Glipkerio Kistomerces
  • Vered at EatNowTalkLater
  • meagen
  • lesleycarter
  • Shaun Pinello
  • isabelcamacho
  • dspecialgoddess
  • Beauty with imperfections
  • mohanmohan
  • Vulpes Veritas
  • MJ, Nonstepmom
  • KKHPhotos.com
  • Thypolar
  • Angelene @Languages Of Art
  • Nora Weston
  • Victoria Schweiss
  • seattlemonkey
  • Jayashree
  • 2minicooks
  • Alicia Hill
  • Cranky
  • the dish diva
  • joygirl
  • Rebekah Carr
  • My Wife Doesn't Think I'm Funny
  • Jennifer
  • TrishaDM
  • ♡ The Tale Of My Heart ♡
  • talin401
  • autumnsunshine124
  • Malou Prestado
  • foodvixennyc
  • theamberlight
  • viennafoodprints
  • tamarasbrown
  • Im Dating A One-Percenter
  • audreyvwbug
  • artistrybyadele
  • Jennifer Avventura
  • ro
  • Jessica
  • TisaLira
  • Mikalee Byerman
  • Tom Baker
  • mellamobao
  • valentinedee
This entry was posted in Cooking and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Flower of the zucchini plant.
.

CSA #8: Summertime? Time for Summer Squash! (via Forked!)

There’s an excellent summer squash/eggplant/pasta recipe in the following post!

CSA #8: Summertime? Time for Summer Squash! By this past week's CSA, I had assembled quite a collection of summer squash, specifically the yellow summer squash variety. Why have I been carefully sealing the squash up and storing it in my crisper when I could have been cleaning it, chopping it, and cooking it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner? Well, the short answer is… I don't really know. The longer answer, the answer that you know I'm going to expound upon because you read this blog and … Read More

via Forked!

Goofy noodles, fancy bacon, & squash? I’m in.

Bought some Campanelle because boxes of pasta were cheap, and it looked neat.

I looked for a campanelle recipe online, & this popped up:

http://www.barillaus.com/Recipes/Campanelle-with-Butternut-Squash-Crispy-Italian-Pancetta-and-Balsamic-Vinegar.aspx

I love all of these ingredients, but I may lose the onion or substitute garlic…
Campanelle with Butternut Squash, Crispy Italian Pancetta and Balsamic Vinegar
INGREDIENTS

  • 1 BOX Barilla Campanelle
  • 1/3 CUP Italian Pancetta, Julienne
  • 1/4 CUP Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1/2 CUP White Onion, Chopped
  • 1 POUND Butternut Squash, Peeled, Cubed
  • TO TASTE Salt
  • TO TASTE Black Pepper, Freshly Ground
  • 1 SPRIG Fresh Rosemary
  • 1 1/2 CUP Chicken Broth
  • TO TASTE Balsamic Vinegar

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

  1. SAUTÉ pancetta in a large skillet over medium- high heat until crispy. Drain excess fat.Set aside.
  2. HEAT olive oil in the same skillet over medium heat. Add onions and rosemary, sauté until golden.
  3. ADD the butternut squash and the chicken broth. Simmer for 10-15 minutes or until the squash gets soft.
  4. DISCARD the rosemary. Season with salt and pepper. Process half of the sauce in the blender until smooth. Thin sauce with more chicken broth if desired. Return sauce to pan.
  5. COOK pasta according to directions and toss with the sauce.
  6. TOP the pasta with pancetta , drizzle with Balsamic vinegar.

Visit BarillaUS.com for more delicious Italian recipe ideas.
©2010 Barilla. All Rights reserved.

Campanelle with Butternut Squash, Crispy Italian Pancetta and Balsamic Vinegar
Campanelle with Butternut Squash, Crispy Italian Pancetta and Balsamic Vinegar

Fettuccine Parmesan

Looks pretty damn tasty:

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”: Make this dish!

 

Make this dish!

This is super fast and easy, plus it is damn tasty.

The base of this recipe is taken from the Joy of Cooking, which you should really consider buying if you don’t already own a copy.

Acorn Squash, Roasted Corn on the Cob, Skillet Steaks, & Duquesne Beer

Recently, we had a ridiculously excellent fall dinner.  I could eat this meal several nights a week, and not grow tired of it.

Delicious Fall Dinner
Acorn Squash, Corn on the Cob, Skillet Steaks, & Duquense Beer!

First up was the acorn squash, which is really easy to prepare once you get the damn thing cut open.  I have recently stopped trying to go through the whole thing at once.  I use a serrated knife and poke from the beside stem into the center, then slice out form the stem all the way back around until I hit the stem again, then crack it open.

After scooping out the seeds (which I always wonder about cooking like pumpkin seeds) and stringy gross stuff, I placed the two halves orange side up in a glass baking dish in about ½” to ¾” of water.  Don’t worry, they actually generally do sit up that way without a problem.  I sliced the tops/insides a little in preparation for the next part…

Acorn Squash, after roasting.
SQUASH!

I melted some butter (or some Country Crock spread actually) in the microwave, probably about 3 tablespoons worth, and added a little bit of brown sugar, stirred, then ladled it on the top & into the cup formed in the middle.  Add it to taste.  I don’t really ever measure this.  If you’re looking for a measurement form me, add what you think is too much brown sugar, then add a pinch more.  I also added a tiny bit of black pepper & paprika to mine this time… but I add that to almost everything.

After that, I placed it in the already pre-heating oven at 400° for about an hour and 5 minutes.  I was going for somewhere between an hour and an hour & 15 minutes, and it worked out closer to the hour this time.  Check on it around the hour mark.  This one was roasted perfectly… the meat of the squash was just melting on to the spoon, & peeling right off of the skin inside.  It was really a great flavorful vegetable.  I don’t know if this is baking or roasting, but whatever it is, it works.  It would have also been good scooped out & served like groovy orange mashed potatoes.

Corn, unressed, re-dressed, & bound for doom!
Corn, undressed, re-dressed, & bound for doom!

Up next was the corn, figuring temperature was more important for the squash, I typically roast corn at 425° or 450° for 20 minutes to a half hour… but figured why not let it ride along with the squash here?

My wife & I carefully pulled back all the husks… just pulled them back not off, then removed the silk.

We buttered (again, we used Country Crock’s butter approximation), salted, & peppered the corn.

Next we wrapped it back up, and tied the tops back together using a loose strand of the husk.  This doesn’t always work out, so sometimes I use foil & make little caps to keep ’em all bound together.

I did a whole post on corn & why you should keep it in the husk, and never ever boil it unless you’re making soup.  You can read that here if you’re interested.  As you can see, “other stuff in the oven” is not even a good excuse to boil corn.  It can go along for the ride.  Proof?  It turned out beautifully:

Oven Roasted Corn on the Cob
Why would you boil corn, when you could have this awesomeness every time?

I wish my cell phone’s camera got better shots.  I need to think farther than Facebook or Twitter when taking food photos, and get the real camera so I can post more to this blog.  The corn husks did smoke a little… but I didn’t see any flames, and it let me know when it was done.  Ha ha ha.  I’ve grown to not rely on timers so much, but to go with temperature and a gut feeling.

Oddly enough for a carnivore like myself, the steak was not the star of this meal.  We just got some thin  skillet steaks and put them on the Foreman grill oiled, salted, & peppered for about 5 minutes, maybe a little less.  They turned out fine.  The Foreman Grill seems to be my go-to tool for cooking meat until I get new knobs for by real grill outside.  I’m in a Yahoo! Group that’s a really good resource for innovative GFG cooking.

I topped it all off with the newly resurrected Duquesne Beer.  [Insert zombie and or Jesus joke here.]  I have a collection of antique bottles and have a Duke beer bottle in with my local stuff… so when I heard that they were making it again, I knew I had to try some.  I was born after the company was dissolved the first time, so I can’t compare it to the original… but it is a nice mellow pilsner that goes well with this kind of dinner.  It rounded out the meal perfectly.

It was aggravating to get my hands on some though… they’ve had a weird release schedule, and no 6 pack shops around me were carrying the stuff.  When one local pizza joint was listed as having the stuff, I went there to buy some and they had no idea what I was talking about.  I ended up buying a case, but luckily I don’t feel “stuck” with something that I don’t like.

Homemade Pizza with Pillsbury Crust

The other night, the wife & I were in the mood for pizza, but not for any of the plethora of local pizza places.  We decided to make our own.  We were going to get one of those pre-made Boboli crusts, but while at the grocery store my wife came across one of those cardboard tubes of pizza dough by Pillsbury.  We decided why not try that?  I like a puffy doughy not quite fully cooked crust.

Well, this wasn’t that… but it was tasty.  It seemed to be pretty thin, but it was flavorful.  We bought the Giant Eagle brand jar o’ pizza sauce because it was way cheaper than the real brands.  I added some brown sugar ’cause I like sweet sauce… but I’m getting ahead of myself.

My wife spread out the dough and I brushed on some extra virgin olive oil and sprinkled on some garlic powder.  Then we put down the sauce & brown sugar mixture, and a 2-cup bag of “4-cheese Italian” shredded cheese.

We put diced green peppers, turkey pepperoni, and canned mushrooms on the whole thing… and I put diced Canadian bacon & chopped olives on my half.  I topped it off with a little leftover taco cheese, and put some crushed red pepper flakes on my side.

We baked it according to the instructions on the weird cardboard roll, and it turned out great.  We need to do homemade pizza night more often!  I think we’ll skip the EVOO step though… I don’t think it was all that necessary.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Homemade pizza FTW!